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TOP 8 most iconic raves

  • Helter Skelter Energy 1997These music promoters are one of the longest-running dance music promoters in the UK. Currently, they are one of the few remaining rave music brands who promote early underground styles of electronic dance music, as opposed to the more mainstream house clubs that followed during the 1990s. Throwback to one of their rave where 18,000 party goers turned up, so you can see they threw some of the most well-remembered raves of the ’90s! πŸ™ŒπŸ» A huge event for its time! πŸ”ˆ

     

  • Sunrise back to the future 1989Β At the very rise of rave culture, this event is certainly one not to be forgotten!!! πŸ’ƒπŸ»πŸ•ΊπŸ»
  • Tiesto Innercity 1992An event, which some might describes as the turning point for Tiesto’s career.
  • Castlemorton illegal rave 1992We’re not condoning illegal activity πŸ‘€ … but this looked like one crazy party πŸ€£πŸ™ŒπŸ» it lasted a whole week and attracted over 20,000 attendees! It was actually this event that changed the law!
  • Aly & Fila Great Pyramids 2015Not many artists can say that they performed at the Great Pyramids of Giza, Aly & Fila are proud to say that they are one of the few that performed at this historical landmark.
  • Carl Cox Space closing 2016The end of an era and the last party at Space Ibiza that we knew and loved.
  • Fantazia New Year’s eve 1993Fantazia first held a rave at Coventry’s Eclipse nightclub, but would soon become best known for its large outdoor events, with the last one attracting over 16 000 people.
  • Fatboy Slim Brighton Beach 2002

    250,000 people partied at this free event 🀯 and even better the sun was a beaming 28 degrees β˜€οΈ proper party! As the Guardian mention: “The music was not due to start until 6.30pm, but some 50,000 partygoers had already arrived in Brighton by 2pm. Off-licences and beach bars were doing a roaring trade, some of them closing early after selling their entire stock of alcohol. The traffic was building up on the A23 into Brighton ,and all the city centre car parks were full.”